Trujillo

Trujillo is a city in coastal northwestern Peru and the capital of La Libertad Region. It is the centre of the second most populous metropolitan area of Peru and most populous city of the North macroregion of the country. It is located on the banks of the Moche River, near its mouth at the Pacific Ocean, in the Moche Valley. This was a site of the great prehistoric Moche and Chimu cultures before the Inca conquest. expansion.

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The Independence of Trujillo from Spain was proclaimed in the Historic Centre of Trujillo on December 29, 1820, and the city was honored in 1822 by the congress of the republic with the title “Meritorious City and Faithful to the Fatherland”, for its role in the fight for independence. Trujillo is the birthplace of Peru’s judiciary, and it was twice designated as the capital of the country. It was the scene of the Revolution of Trujillo in 1932. Trujillo is considered the “cradle of liberty and cradle of the judiciary in Peru.”

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Trujillo is also known as the “Capital of the everlasting Spring”, is considered the “Capital of the Marinera,” a traditional dance in Peru, “Cradle of the typical Peruvian Paso Horse,” as well as the “Capital of Culture of Peru”. It has sponsored numerous national and international cultural events, and has a lively arts community. Current festivals include the “National Marinera Festival”, the Trujillo Spring Festival and the International Book Festival, which is one of the most important cultural events in the country. Trujillo is close to two major archeological sites of pre-Columbian monuments: Chan Chan, the largest adobe city in the ancient world, designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986; and the temples of the Sun and Moon (the largest adobe pyramid in Peru).

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The city center contains many examples of colonial and religious architecture, often incorporating distinctive wrought ironwork. It includes residential areas, a central business district, and industrial supply distribution to the various districts. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Trujillo has its seat here. Catholicism is the predominant religion and 10 colonial churches are located within the old city wall, now encircled by Avenida España; additional churches in the towns of Huaman, Huanchaco and Moche are located within 15 kilometres of Trujillo’s centre.

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Since 2011, the city has been developing the pilot project Trujillo: Sustainable City, as part of the platform, “Emerging and Sustainable Cities of the Inter-American Development Bank,” in cooperation with the IDB. In 2012 Trujillo was selected by IBM to participate in a “Smarter Cities Challenge” project intended to improve public safety and transportation through technology. Trujillo is located at an altitude of 34 meters on a coastal strip west of the province of Trujillo, in the old valley of “Chimor” today known as the Moche or Santa Catalina Valley. Its main square is located at 8 ° 6 ‘3 ” South latitude ; to 79 ° 1’ 34″ west longitude at an altitude of 31.16 meters above sea level and lies 4.40 km of the Pacific Ocean, in a straight line along Larco Avenue.

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Tourism is a major industry in Trujillo due to the city’s proximity to important sites where the Moche and Chimu civilizations evolved. These civilizations had highly skilled artisans, and many of their artifacts having been found during archaeological digs in the city. Nearby ruins include the Chimu adobe city of Chan Chan, the world’s largest city built from that material. It is sometimes called Ciudad de la Luna (City of the Moon) because the people worshipped the moon; or de las Largas Murallas (of the Long Walls). In size and complexity, it has been compared with Teotihuacan in Mexico, and the ancient cities of Egypt. Other nearby ruins are the Moche ruins of Huaca del Sol, Huaca de la Luna, Huaca del Dragón o Arco Iris, Huaca Esmeralda and El Brujo.

imageTrujillo aspires to be designated a World Heritage Site, because of the proximity of both cultures and its historical colonial city centre, whose historic casonas (mansions) attract many visitors. The mansions and manors of Trujillo are distinguished for their solemn and austere facades. Inside, their halls are overflowing with ornaments. Trujillo’s wrought-iron window railings are a unique feature of the mansions. The House of Ganoza-Chopitea (casa Ganoza) has a polychromatic front in the baroque style, crowned by a rococo frontispiece and two lions.

 

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It is the city’s most representative example of casonas architecture. Another is the House of Mayorazgo, which was built in the early years of the city and holds one of Peru’s greatest numismatic collections. The revolutionary leader Simón Bolívar lived in a house on the Plaza de Armas. The world-famous beach Huanchaco, a surfing destination, is located just north of Trujillo. Trujillo’s restaurants offer a wide variety of local food, such as shambar, mostly served on Mondays; ceviche, sopa teologa and cabrito.